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Piedmont Grown connects farms and forks

Having a hard time finding local, farm-fresh food?
Just go to Piedmont Grown’s website, type in tomatoes and your county, and find the most sought-after summertime prize of the North Carolina Piedmont.
Any day of the year, www.piedmontgrown.org can make your desire to eat local foods, quick and easy.
Piedmont Grown farmers and local food system businesses will meet Tuesday at the Guilford County Extension Center to talk about how to promote local farm products and agritourism opportunities through the meeting’s theme, “Know Your Resources.”
Formed in June of 2011, Piedmont Grown seeks to raise awareness about local farm products and direct farm marketing options such as pick-your-owns, farm stands, community supported agriculture programs, as well as farm tours and events.
The meeting’s agenda includes a panel discussion with a variety of local food experts.
“The goal of this meeting is to reach out to farmers and other local food businesses of all sizes in all 37 counties in the Piedmont Grown region and share resources so that each business can grow to meet the increasing demand for locally grown, made, or raised farm products,” said Noah Ranells, Piedmont Grown board member.
The annual meeting is free for all Piedmont Grown enrollees and $25 for all other individuals. To register for the meeting and Piedmont Grown, visit http://www.piedmontgrown.org or email info@piedmontgrown.org .
Anyone can join Piedmont Grown. Enrollment is easy using the web-based certification process.
The cost is $50 for local food system businesses and $25 for farmers and supporting individuals and organizations.
Piedmont Grown’s easy-to-spot logo featuring a stylized plant and crop field in green can be seen on farmer’s products and menus and in retail shops to guide consumers to certified products.
Reviews of the logo have been favorable from farmers and chefs, as well as from consumers and food brokers.
Piedmont Grown was formed with $40,000 in funding from the Appalachian Sustainable Ag Project’s Strong Roots grant program that was supported by the Tobacco Trust Fund Commission.

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